Bread and Butter License

A Bread and Butter License is no different than a work License. It may be called Bread and Butter meaning it is just the basics.
It will allow you to drive to and from work, school, and medical treatment just like the PA work license.

This type of license is available for a range of violations, but there are some violations that will disqualify you for the bread and butter
license or work license.

  • DUI – Must serve a minimum term of suspension.
  • 1786f Driving without insurance
  • Drug possession charges
  • 1543 – Driving under suspension (in some cases)
  • Major violations (reckless driving, fleeing the police, etc..)

This is just a short list of violations that will disqualify you from getting a bread and butter or work license.

Our state legislators are working on a bill that will allow first time drug offenders to get a bread and butter or work license in PA.
This bill known as House Bill 1323 or “Fairness for Bread and Butter PA Driver’s Licenses” will give the same rights that first time
DUI offenders have with regards to anyone violating the cosmetic act in Pennsylvania.

Bread and Butter – Work License Types

Pennsylvania Work license

Our state legislators are working on a bill that will allow first time drug offenders to get a bread and butter or work license in PA. This
bill known as House Bill 1323 or “Fairness for Bread and Butter PA Driver’s Licenses” will give the same rights that first time DUI offenders
have with regards to anyone violating the cosmetic act in Pennsylvania.

FROM: State Rep. Jake Wheatley Jr., D-Allegheny

TO: Editorial Page Editor

DATE: Oct. 19, 2009

Fairness for ‘bread and butter’ Pa. driver’s licenses

The House Transportation Committee recently held a hearing on my bill that would give more first-time offenders in Pennsylvania a chance
to turn their lives around. Current law allows first-time DUI offenders to obtain an occupational limited driver’s license, often called a “bread
and butter license,” giving them the ability to support their families and begin to rebuild their lives. This opportunity does not extend to
first-time drug offenders.

My legislation (H.B. 1323), which has bipartisan support, would equalize this situation and provide first-time drug offenders the same
opportunity to get to and from work, school and medical treatments.Under the bill, a first-time drug offender would have to serve 60 days
of his or her license suspension to qualify for the limited license, the same as first-time DUI offenders do now.Citizens who would like to
contact their state legislators in support of H.B. 1323 can visit www.legis.state.pa.us
and use the “Find Members” function at the top right of the page.

In addition to seeking prompt passage of this bill, I also intend to work on developing a driver’s license program that would work
with problem-solving courts such as drug treatment courts, mental health courts and DUI treatment courts that help willing offenders
get back on track. Such a licensing program would enable many offenders whose cases go to those courts to become employable
again and return to being contributing members of society.

State Rep. Jake Wheatley, Jr.

19th Legislative District